<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 1/8/2020 6:16 AM, Tanstaafl wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:2d9db074-4d70-1eb1-74a6-e1fd5016b45d@libertytrek.org">
      <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">On Tue Jan 07 2020 11:57:10 GMT-0500 (Eastern Standard Time), Ryan Sipes
<a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:ryan@thunderbird.net"><ryan@thunderbird.net></a> wrote:
</pre>
      <blockquote type="cite">
        <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">You would be surprised Axel, 30% sounds exactly right.

Check this out: <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://stats.thunderbird.net/">https://stats.thunderbird.net/</a>
</pre>
      </blockquote>
      <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">
Change the date range on that to 1-6-18 to 1-6-20 so it shows a full two
years, and it shows the exact same dip last January...
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    You can also click "All" and you will see the full set of time we
    have data for(Aug 1 2018 and forward). It defaults to 1y because
    that's the most useful cyclical period we have. Month-to-month and
    week-to-week have a lot of variation. There are 3 yearly, temporary
    slumps: Christmas, Easter, and August which is European Vacation
    Month.<br>
    <br>
    Our user base is heavily business oriented so any time that people
    are not working, we see dips. This is also why older versions cycle
    up in % on the % adi graph during the week, and down on weekends.
    Business users are slightly more likely to be using older versions,
    and they are a lower proportion of users on weekends.<br>
    <br>
    P.S. You can click version numbers in the legend at the bottom of
    the graph on the % page to make lower % items easier to see.<br>
    <br>
    In the future, I suggest looking at global stats(or at least <a
      moz-do-not-send="true"
href="https://addons.thunderbird.net/en-US/thunderbird/addon/lightning/statistics/">Lightning</a>,
    which accounts for ~85% of users) to compare to before panicking.
    It's always important to remember that any major shift over a short
    time period is far more likely to be a data artifact than a real
    effect.<br>
  </body>
</html>