<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 28-Nov-19 12:38 AM, Jay Hankins
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:C8F0F886-E5B5-49AB-9D79-A48EF7D9AC35@gmail.com">
      <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">Michael,

</pre>
      <blockquote type="cite">
        <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">On Nov 27, 2019, at 8:15 AM, Michael Peddemors <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:michael@linuxmagic.com"><michael@linuxmagic.com></a> wrote:

hehehe.. doesn't DoH (DNS over HTTPS) give the ability to track? Kind of incongruous don't you think?
</pre>
      </blockquote>
      <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">
I’m curious what about DoH you think gives “the ability to track”. Can you explain? </pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    In this instance all your DNS queries that used to go to your chosen
    DNS provider,  usually the ISP,  are now being directed to a central
    provider.  In the case of the Firefox defaults cloudfare,  who have
    signed agreements with Mozilla about what they will and will not
    retain because Mozilla can see the possible pitfalls.  Including
    cloudfare (Or whatever provider is used) knowing what sites you
    visit in the various privacy modes.  DNS is typically anonymous, but
    that does not make the data useless in profiling and to some extent
    deanonymizing it.  I am not saying regular DNS is not already used
    as a mine of information,  it is.  But to some extent this makes the
    trove much larger as the application will come with a default
    provider, whereas until now that was mostly data the ISP had access
    to and sold.<br>
    <br>
    Some source documents on DNS and DOH and their cash cow status<br>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/6538356-Mozilla-Letter-to-Congress-on-DoH.html">https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/6538356-Mozilla-Letter-to-Congress-on-DoH.html</a><br>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20191104/07341243314/mozilla-isps-are-lying-about-encrypted-dns-should-have-privacy-practices-investigated.shtml">https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20191104/07341243314/mozilla-isps-are-lying-about-encrypted-dns-should-have-privacy-practices-investigated.shtml</a><br>
    <br>
    But it does not really matter what provider you have for DNS,  you
    are providing them with details of every site you visit and when.
    Based on subsequent requests from you a reasonable case can be made
    for how long you stay on the site.  Baring leaving the tab open a
    month,  which I do for some things.<br>
    <br>
    Matt
  </body>
</html>