<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">
      <p><br>
      </p>
      <p>First off: I'm not against keeping the current "Get a new email
        address" button in the "Account creation dialog", as long as it
        stays no more prominent than it is. I think any more prominent
        would not be in the users' interest.<br>
      </p>
      <p>Mark Banner wrote:<br>
      </p>
      <div class="moz-cite-prefix">
        <blockquote type="cite"
          cite="mid:7ce8c5c6-601a-98c2-7fba-53d9c1c816a5@beonex.com">
          <div class="moz-cite-prefix">At the time, we were looking for
            ways for generating income</div>
        </blockquote>
      </div>
      <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
        Right. But it didn't bring income. Less than 1% of Thunderbird's
        income came from the partnership deal, whereas 99% come from
        donations.</div>
      <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
      </div>
      <div class="moz-cite-prefix">If users get the idea that you make
        money this cheesy way, they are less inclined to donate. Given
        the huge difference, even a small drop of 3% in donations means
        we lost money.<br>
      </div>
      <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
      </div>
      <p> </p>
      <blockquote type="cite"
        cite="mid:7ce8c5c6-601a-98c2-7fba-53d9c1c816a5@beonex.com">
        <div class="moz-cite-prefix">I don't have the details (and I
          wasn't directly involved in it), but from what I remember,
          there was research showing that a significant number of people
          downloading Thunderbird from the website were also expecting
          to get an email address.</div>
      </blockquote>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">I was involved, and I've heard this
      "research" being cited over and over and over again, but nobody
      has ever been able to show me. It always depends on who you ask,
      how you ask, and what you tell them before you ask.</div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">As mentioned, the <i>actual</i>
      numbers from real world use, over many many years, show that this
      research was faulty.<br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">More importantly, if even that was
      true, the results don't determine a conclusion. Even if people who
      never heard about Thunderbird before <b>think</b> that
      "Thunderbird email" will give them an email address (which is a
      good bet, indeed, given how every other email company tries to
      give them one), that doesn't mean they <b>want</b> it. It could
      just as well mean the exact opposite: That they do not want a new
      email address, and the idea that Thunderbird will give them one is
      a reason not to install Thunderbird, because it's too much hassle
      to move.</div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">If you want to know what users think
      and want and what their pain points are, the best way is to do
      evangelism among your non-computer friends. Your family, your
      wife's friends etc.. Try to "sell" them Thunderbird. See what they
      say. Most likely, they'll say that they are good with Google,
      meaning their email address. If you convinced them, install it
      together with them, and let them set it up themselves. You'll very
      quickly notice where they struggle and what they like.</div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">When I tell my friends that they can
      keep their email address, they are happy. You should see their
      eyes when they see all their emails appear in Thunderbird. They
      are overjoyed!</div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">---</div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">Why am I explaining this so much? By
      putting "New email address" front and center, you might not
      actually achieve your goal of attracting new users. In fact, you
      may very well delude the brand message of Thunderbird as an email
      client that's made to work natively with <b>all</b> email
      providers. Other providers are not a second class citizen that is
      just supported as well (many web mail providers can do that), but
      that's how Thunderbird is meant to be used.</div>
    <p>I've always suspected the main reason for the "get new email
      address" feature was money, and it seems to be the motivation here
      again.<br>
    </p>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">Alessandro Castellani wrote on 30.04.19
      19:23:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:da075632-6fb2-4290-87cd-c534568eb785@thunderbird.net">I
      implemented that secondary button as Ryan told me there are
      potential partnerships happening with various email providers.
      Offering a "spotlight" placement in TB is pretty important in
      order to close profitable deals with email providers, opposed to
      something like "We're gonna put a link on one of our web pages".
      We need a stronger selling point.<br>
    </blockquote>
    <p><br>
    </p>
    <p>See above. What sets Thunderbird apart from others is that it
      does not act in financial self-interest, but for the user and user
      only. This kind of thinking is dangerous.</p>
    <p>I'm not again making money. We all have to live. But there are
      opportunities where it can help what users want to do anyways,
      instead of pushing something on them that they didn't want. "It's
      bad for users" Answer: "But it brings us money" is a bad
      direction.<br>
    </p>
    <p><br>
    </p>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:da075632-6fb2-4290-87cd-c534568eb785@thunderbird.net">
      <p> </p>
      <p>The idea is to offer the ability to create a new email account
        directly inside Thunderbird without leaving the client.
        Furthermore, once the email has been created, TB would complete
        the setup automatically. A seamless implementation for that tiny
        % of users that need a new email address.</p>
    </blockquote>
    <p><br>
    </p>
    <p>Yes, I agree with that idea. If we can offer that seamless setup,
      that's a great thing. I'd much rather create a new email address
      directly in Thunderbird than at a third party website and then set
      it up in Thunderbird again.</p>
    <p><br>
    </p>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:da075632-6fb2-4290-87cd-c534568eb785@thunderbird.net">
      <p>the low % of usage can be attributed to many factors, like a
        disconnected and confusing UI, unavailability of multiple
        providers, and lacking of a properly guided experience.<br>
        That implementation might have been a failure, but ... We should
        identify road blocks, pain points, and iterate upon that.</p>
    </blockquote>
    <p><br>
    </p>
    <p>I expected that response. Unfortunately, placement and UI were
      not the problem.</p>
    <p>The placement was much much more prominent than it is now. After
      installing and starting Thunderbird the first time, the very first
      dialog you saw was "Create a new email address", with the provider
      registration hookup. That was the entire dialog. The "Set up
      existing email address" was merely a small button at the bottom.
      I.e. exactly inverse as it is now. You can't possibly get any more
      prominent than that.<br>
    </p>
    <p>Still, despite this maximal prominent placement, and OTOH the
      "set up existing" dialog had to specifically looked out for,
      100000 time more people set up an existing email address rather
      than subscribe to a new one. I think it's can't be any clearer.s</p>
    <p>It wasn't due to lack of effort in the "get new" dialog, either.
      They are trying to generate attractive email addresses and domains
      for you, set it up automatically, etc. You can probably style it
      nicer, but it's be surprised if you manage to make the
      registration and setup process more seamless.<br>
    </p>
    <p><br>
    </p>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:da075632-6fb2-4290-87cd-c534568eb785@thunderbird.net">If
      this is related to the current dialog in TB, I'm sorry but I
      strongly disagree. ... lazily aligned and misplaced.<br>
      <p> The input's helpers text are inline, which makes the dialog
        longer that it needs. If there's an error, the message with a
        misaligned icon appears to the right of the helper text, making
        the dialog grow, causing elements and focus points to shift.<br>
        The configuration steps are not styled at all</p>
    </blockquote>
    <p><br>
    </p>
    <p>Oh, yes. I totally agree. If you're talking about styling, that
      means visuals, then yes, the current dialog leaves a lot to be
      desired. Styling, placement etc. could all be much better. Agreed
      on that.</p>
    <p>If you want to improve the styling, go ahead.</p>
    <p>What I was referring to was user experience (UX), meaning: Is the
      user lost? Do we show something that the user didn't want or need?
      Or do we do what he wanted to do anyway? Do we help him along the
      way, on difficult points (like finding the right servers)? Do we
      help him avoid common pitfalls and errors (like the "bob" as
      Name)? Do we guide him alone the most commonly needed path, and
      make that really easy, but allow users with different needs still
      to do what they want?</p>
    <p>I think the dialog does that part very well. It has exactly what
      most of the users need, and intentionally does not have what only
      a tiny percentage of users (<1%) need.</p>
    <p>So, what is on the screen and what is not, I would say that's
      very good. The styling is horrendous, I would concur.</p>
    <p>(The part I hate the most is the "you don't have SSL" warning.
      It's good that the window background becomes red, that shows the
      urgency. But the specific color of the red, and the placement, and
      the styling, are so ... making my eyes hurt.)</p>
    <p>Regarding errors:<br>
    </p>
    <p>Mark suggested to make the error tooltip appear without hover. I
      think that would be an acceptable compromise for the above 3
      fields. The errors there are not coming from the server and rather
      obvious.</p>
    <p>(The errors that come later in the setup process, on
      configuration server failures or login failures, are very
      important, and need to be shown, in full without cutting off, and
      need to stay on screen without going away, because they are direct
      instructions to end users and they are the kind of thing you need
      to read to your support helpdesk. Making server errors less
      prominent would lead to huge UX problems and cause endless pain to
      end users.)</p>
    <p>End note:<br>
    </p>
    <p>If you can make it more beautiful, without changing the logic
      (removing or adding stuff), then I think the result will be very
      positive. I for one would be very happy about it.</p>
    <p>Ben<br>
    </p>
    <p><br>
    </p>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:da075632-6fb2-4290-87cd-c534568eb785@thunderbird.net">
      <p>I hope we can all agree that the current dialog is not a great
        "First Experience" to offer to new users. That dialog sells TB
        short, making it look unpolished, non-curated, and kind of like
        an amateur old software.<br>
        <br>
      </p>
      <p><b>Tooltips and error messages</b></p>
      <div class="moz-signature">
        <p>To guide the user in typing proper information, we can use a
          combination of placeholder text and tooltips. Showing all the
          text at all times is not a good solution as it clutters the
          dialog and distracts the user.</p>
      </div>
      <div class="moz-signature">
        <p>Tooltips can also be triggered dynamically without changing
          the size of the dialog, which we should avoid as it disrupts
          the experience.</p>
      </div>
      <div class="moz-signature">
        <p>If the user types "bob", we can have a check in place for
          lowercase single words in order to trigger a timed tooltip to
          state "This is the name your recipients will see", or
          something like that.<br>
          If the email is incorrect, the field can shake and a timed
          tooltip can appear.<br>
          Tooltip messages can be shown on mouseover as well.</p>
      </div>
      <div class="moz-signature">
        <p>All these solutions create visual cues that catch the user's
          eye, without moving elements around or changing the location
          of fields and buttons, like it happens in the current field.<br>
          <br>
        </p>
        <p><b>Cancel the dialog<br>
          </b></p>
        <p>This is something I'd like to hear your thoughts about it.
          Since any dialog can be closed through the window controls, do
          we want to highlight this option with a dedicated button?</p>
        <p>The idea here is to somewhat prevent this if the user access
          TB for the first time and no accounts is set up. Is TB usable
          in any way without an account?</p>
        <p>Anyway, a "Set Up Later" button or link can be added on the
          first screen, but I wouldn't add it or keep it once the user
          is in the funnel, to prevent accidental clicks or confusion
          with the back button.</p>
        <p><br>
        </p>
        <p>Thanks again everyone for taking the time to review these
          mock-ups.<br>
          Taking design decisions is always hard as everyone has its own
          taste and expectations, but I'm sure we can all work together
          to improve the experience of using TB, and create an interface
          that it's modern and appealing, and can help us solve
          problems, gain new users, and solidify the trust with our
          current audience.</p>
        <p>Cheers,<br>
        </p>
      </div>
      <div class="moz-signature">-- <br>
        <span><b>Alessandro Castellani</b><br>
          Lead UX Architect<br>
          Thunderbird</span></div>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">_______________________________________________
tb-planning mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:tb-planning@mozilla.org">tb-planning@mozilla.org</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/tb-planning">https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/tb-planning</a>
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <p><br>
    </p>
  </body>
</html>