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    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 29-Dec-16 2:40 PM, Jim wrote:<br>
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cite="mid:CAF6z7pv2wsK7gQpPXeKb6XkEGDjsxvewTqk3fH3rTP9QMWwB+Q@mail.gmail.com">
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          <div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Dec 28, 2016 at 7:53 PM,
            Óvári <span dir="ltr"><<a
                href="mailto:ovari21@gmail.com" target="_blank"
                moz-do-not-send="true">ovari21@gmail.com</a>></span>
            wrote:<br>
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                <div class="gmail-m_5825347529739501793moz-text-html"
                  lang="x-unicode"> Perhaps the paradigm of what
                  Thunderbird is needs evolving from: just an email
                  client (just HTML email) → personal information
                  manager (PIM) → <b>communications platform</b> with
                  enterprise security, performance and partnerships
                  based on open standards which is suitable for all
                  devices (desktop, laptop, mobile, ...) and all
                  platforms (Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, iOS, ...)?<br>
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            <div>If you listen to jwz, this is what killed Netscape:
              <<a href="https://www.jwz.org/doc/groupware.html"
                moz-do-not-send="true">https://www.jwz.org/doc/groupware.html</a>>.
              I would be very cautious about going down this road.<br>
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            <div>- Jim<br>
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    Or just stop with the PIM part without the groupware.<br>
    <br>
    These days even "individuals" have hundreds of "contacts" that they
    want to keep synchronized between devices. They might want to ring,
    email or snap chat the contact.  Thunderbird to stay relevant has to
    encompass the users view of what a contact is and what they should
    be able to do with it.<br>
    <br>
    Matt<br>
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