<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">To borrow a recent phrase from Ben:<br>
      <br>
      <blockquote type="cite">Normally we don't do "me too", but: <br>
        <br>
        What rkent said. exactly that.</blockquote>
      <br>
      :)<br>
      <br>
      <br>
      On 12/19/2016 6:02 PM, R Kent James <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:kent@caspia.com"><kent@caspia.com></a> wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:a912c222-2c51-d0c3-bdbc-f34b19200636@caspia.com"
      type="cite">
      <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
        http-equiv="Content-Type">
      On 12/19/2016 2:34 PM, Ben Bucksch wrote:<br>
      <blockquote
        cite="mid:4E7424BC-B698-4DEC-8290-01CC5F0C4179@beonex.com"
        type="cite">Normally we don't do "me too", but given that rkent
        is actually seriously arguing it: </blockquote>
      <br>
      I'm not arguing for it. What I am saying is:<br>
      <br>
      1) Forking or freezing Gecko is a choice that others have made
      differently from us, so saying it is not a choice is unhelpful.<br>
      <br>
      2) We do not want to fork Gecko for a variety of reasons.<br>
      <br>
      3) If we believe what the Firefox folks are saying, then it is
      going to be increasingly difficult to follow on our current path
      of compiling Thunderbird as a variant of Firefox. At some point in
      the future, forking will be our only choice. Since that is not a
      choice that we want to be forced to make, then we need to be
      actively moving away from compiling as a binary variant of
      Firefox.<br>
      <br>
      What I <i>have</i> argued for in the past is having the check-in
      source of Thunderbird in comm-central be based on a "last known
      good" revision of m-central, or even on known releases of m-c,
      with someone actively managing the last know good revision, and
      working on patches to allow that last known revision to advance.
      That is how every other project with an upstream code source
      works, and I don't understand why this is considered such a
      radical proposal here. If we start using React, is someone going
      to demand that we build using nightly developer updates of React
      instead of known releases?<br>
      <br>
      Really the only difference between Magnus' and my position is that
      he is more optimistic than I am about how difficult it is going to
      be to continue build on the Firefox code base. How about you,
      BenB? Are you optimistic? I'm guessing not, so I would guess you
      are closer to my position than Magnus'.<br>
      <br>
      :rkent<br>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>