<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;
      charset=windows-1252">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 17-Dec-16 1:54 AM, Disaster Master
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:f2273f62-0389-ab8e-7b21-2990cb9aee97@gmail.com">
      <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
        http-equiv="Content-Type">
      <br>
      Again, if certain parts become too great of a risk (ie, Gecko
      security issues too difficult to fix), reduce HTML rendering
      capability as is necessary to minimize/eliminate the risks.<br>
    </blockquote>
    <i>I think this is really a bit of a bad idea from a champion of
      user choice in user interface and customization.  You want the
      program flexible in the area that of customization that interests
      you,  but in the area  of HTML rendering you want to "lock it
      down".<br>
      <br>
      I am looking forward to a time when we can see the full impact of
      HTML5 in email.  Thunderbird currently supports much more of it
      that some other providers and therefore it is not getting the
      traction that it deserves.  But I am dead against locking things
      down to a small subset as Gmail has done, holding up non text
      email up as a result.  All in the name of security.  Not
      supporting scripting languages I accept and understand, as I
      support no Flash.  But Thunderbird must support the HTML
      specification as it stands now and into the future.<br>
      <br>
      Matt</i>
  </body>
</html>