<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    On 25/08/2015 11:11, Dave Koelmeyer wrote:<br>
    <blockquote cite="mid:55DC3F4F.7080404@davekoelmeyer.co.nz"
      type="cite">
      <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
        http-equiv="Content-Type">
      Hi Kent, <br>
      <br>
      <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 25/08/15 21:31, R Kent James
        wrote:<br>
      </div>
      <blockquote cite="mid:55DC35E6.7000504@caspia.com" type="cite">
        <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;
          charset=windows-1252">
        This is the text from a blog post today on the Thunderbird blog:<br>
        <br>
        See <a moz-do-not-send="true" class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
href="https://blog.mozilla.org/thunderbird/2015/08/thunderbird-and-end-to-end-email-encryption-should-this-be-a-priority/">https://blog.mozilla.org/thunderbird/2015/08/thunderbird-and-end-to-end-email-encryption-should-this-be-a-priority/</a><br>
        <br>
        <p>Should this be a focus for Thunderbird development?<br>
        </p>
      </blockquote>
      <br>
      Insofar as it being a critical differentiating feature for
      Thunderbird, I think so yes. There is likely a niche to be made
      here for particularly sensitive industries where endpoint
      encryption in an email client would be a powerful selling point
      (something I am pushing myself with Thunderbird and prospective
      clients).<br>
    </blockquote>
    Personally, I think if you're going to chase email encryption, I
    think you should look at getting wider industry adoption or
    improvements, not just a niche feature for Thunderbird. That way, it
    improves it for everyone, and will gain a wider user population -
    and is more likely to be successful. Many people don't use
    Thunderbird, and if they can't receive encrypted emails (and read
    them), then it'll reduce the usefulness for a lot of users, possibly
    to the extent they don't bother using it at all.<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote type="cite">Having said that, Enigmail's setup wizard is
      actually pretty straightforward (albeit generally still needs a
      little technical know-how and explanation to get up and running
      for non-technical users). </blockquote>
    The fact this needs technical know-how and co-operation at both ends
    has really been the limiting factor IMHO. I think this is the bit
    that really needs solving, or making simple in a very easy to
    understand way.<br>
    <br>
    Mark.<br>
  </body>
</html>