<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix"><br>
      <div class="moz-signature">
        <style type="text/css">
.myName:hover, .myName > a:hover { font-size:13pt; text-shadow: 3px 3px 4px rgba(200,250,200,0.7);}
.moz-signature {opacity: 1.0 !important;}
.myName a { cursor: pointer !important; transition:font-size 0.5s;}
</style>
        <div id="mySignature" style="width: 65%; padding: 0.8em 1.2em;
          font:x-small verdana; color: #444; box-shadow: 4px 4px 9px
          -2px rgba(0,0,0,0.65); border-radius: 1em; padding: 0.4em 2em;
          border: 1px dashed #444; background: rgb(230,240,163);
          background: linear-gradient(to bottom, rgba(230,240,163,1)
          0%,rgba(210,230,56,1) 50%,rgba(195,216,37,1)
          51%,rgba(219,240,67,1) 100%);">
          <b class="myName" style="text-shadow: 1px 1px 2px #DDD;
            transition:font-size 0.5s;">%identity(name,link)%</b>
          <br>
          Software Developer
          <br>
          Thunderbird Add-ons Developer
          <span style="color:#666666; font-size:xx-small">(QuickFolders,
            quickFilters, QuickPasswords, Zombie Keys, SmartTemplate4)</span>
          <br>
          AMO Editor </div>
      </div>
      On 28/04/2014 16:16, Ben Bucksch wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote cite="mid:535E70B3.7040101@beonex.com" type="cite">Gervase
      Markham wrote, On 28.04.2014 16:58:
      <br>
      <blockquote type="cite">But the sort of questions I would want to
        find answers to are:
        <br>
        <br>
        * What does Google hope to gain by making this change? Is it an
        <br>
        anti-spam/anti-fraud measure?
        <br>
      </blockquote>
      1. They block login attempts from a new country. Presumably that's
      anti-account-theft.
      <br>
      <br>
      2. When that triggers, they demand a working phone number, where
      they send an activation code. Strangely, that can be any phone
      number. They pretend that's for "security", but the "nice" side
      effect for them is that using a phone number, they can link the
      account to a real life identity. Given that they also link the
      account to all searches I make on Google, that's a privacy
      invasion for me. But for Google, that means $$.
      <br>
      <br>
      3. Long-term, their goal is to move everything (Internet and
      offline) to the web, and to their servers. They want to kill MS
      Office, email, phone etc., moving it to gmail, google cloud etc.
      They are not doing all this for fun, after all.
      <br>
      <br>
      <blockquote type="cite">* Can the additional data about logins
        that Google hopes to obtain be
        <br>
        obtained in other ways for IMAP?
        <br>
      </blockquote>
      <br>
      You can't ask for a phone number via IMAP. But I reject that
      premise and interest.
      <br>
      <br>
      If a suspicious login attempt shows up via IMAP or SMTP, they can
      return an error (in IMAP/SMTP) *with* an error message that
      mentions reason and remedy, e.g.
      <br>
      "You are logging in from a new country. Please log in via
      <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://www.gmail.com">https://www.gmail.com</a> first and approve this connection."
      <br>
      This is (more or less) how some German freemail ISPs do it.
      <br>
      This is a manual hand-over, but a) would happen only in really
      problematic cases b) give them the same possibilities as now.
      <br>
    </blockquote>
    don't they already do something like this (I think you have to
    enable IMAP access through their web site first). The bigger issue
    would be if that would have to be done on every session (?)<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>