<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    Many of you may not be aware that there is an mxr instance that
    searches the code in all extensions on AMO,
    <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://mxr.mozilla.org/addons/">https://mxr.mozilla.org/addons/</a>  This is however protected by a
    layer of security, so it requires a Mozilla LDAP account and special
    rights to use. Not sure who manages that security, but addon editor
    lead Jorge gave me the permissions.<br>
    <br>
    When a patch is likely to make a change that impacts extensions, it
    would be good practice to look for specific addons and include the
    authors in the discussion. <a
      href="https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=780473"><b>Bug 780473</b></a>
    -<span id="summary_alias_container"> " <span
        id="short_desc_nonedit_display">optimize some operations in the
        filter list" is a good example of where that was done. A
        proposed patch was going to change the calling sequence to a
        javascript function, and it was not hard to find the few
        extension authors that use that functi</span></span>on and reach
    out to those authors. Now the authors are all involved in the bug
    discussions. This is not only a courtesy, but also good for
    developing the Thunderbird community. If you were an extension
    writer, wouldn't you much prefer a message saying "Hey we're
    thinking of changing this feature that impacts you extension - what
    do you think?" instead of simply finding a few versions later that
    you extension mysteriously stops working?<br>
    <br>
    I don't want to create additional efforts for reviewers, it is hard
    enough as it is, but I would encourage you to consider impacts on
    extensions from javascript changes when doing reviews.<br>
    <br>
    rkent<br>
    <br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>