Donation link: next step

Dave Koelmeyer dave.koelmeyer at davekoelmeyer.co.nz
Fri Nov 29 05:35:42 UTC 2013


On 29/11/13 05:58, Wayne Mery (Thunderbird QA) wrote:
>> Really flattering articles such as
>> http://www.macnewsworld.com/story/79344.html continue to be missed on
>> the social networks which is just a huge shame. For example, Apple
>> stuffing up Gmail support in Mavericks Mail.app was a marketing angle
>> straight from heaven to be exploited by Mozilla, but there was no
>> offical mention of this on Facebook /et al/.
>>
>> Quite frankly, I'm champing at the bit to help kickstart things here.
>
> No time like the present for anyone to step up their involvement - 
> https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird#Contributing
>
> Sadly, publicity and marketing is missing from that list, which as you 
> imply we don't do well.  It's down under "Other" with 
> https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird:Marketing ... which is incomplete 
> and what was drafted afaik hasn't made progress.
>
> One of the failings of TB marketing IMO is we don't involve the user 
> community enough.  And Thunderbird's continuation requires community 
> involvement now more than ever, as other threads have pointed out. 
> Firefox* with its hundreds of employees can afford to not be so 
> agressive in asking for community involvement in its UI.  We can't 
> survive with that model.  (Plus Firefox* get their message out very 
> effectively in other forms of mass marketting - we don't have that 
> either.)  End of story.
>
> Time for a group of people to hammer on these things, no?

High time. Your remark on involving the community more is echoed in my 
initial comment at https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894241

This would be an ideal way in which a non-developer can contribute time 
(something I am sure is a valuable commodity for developers and for 
Mozilla staffers tied up with FFOS). Once we get a bit more engagement 
going again with TB users on social networks then perhaps we can 
carefully and collectively explore the notion of soliciting donations 
via these channels?

In short: as soon as someone from Mozilla can grant me access I'm happy 
to get started!

>
>
>>>> I see rather a few recent articles of large migrations to open source
>>>> productivity suites specifically mention Thunderbird (e.g.
>>>> https://joinup.ec.europa.eu/community/osor/news/french-interior-ministry-open-source-5-10-times-cheaper). 
>>>>
>>>> Given that these organisations have spent so much effort switching,
>>>> and claim to have saved thousands in the process, then surely it
>>>> would be worth reaching out to them to see what financial or other
>>>> contributions they can make back to Thunderbird to keep the project
>>>> alive and open - and therefore continue to future proof their
>>>> investment in moving off proprietary systems.
>>>
>>> That's a tough sell. Esp. given that they move away to save money,
>>> they're not happy to spend it. Once it works and is accepted in the
>>> enterprise, the willingness to spend money goes to near zero. The only
>>> moment to pitch them is *before* they roll out, when they make their
>>> financial planning and schedule for the entire migration.
>>
>> Tough perhaps, but I don't see this as insurmountable and it's surely
>> worth an enquiry.
>
> Indeed. In fact, why do we insist on the hit or miss approach of 
> guessing what might work?  We should just go and ask some of them what 
> would motivate them.
>
> I started writing before I read all of these posts, and found myself 
> repeating - so I'll just say we need to set a direction and execute. 
> What's a thousand bucks to one of these big organizations compared to 
> the cost of running some paid software? It's a way for them to give 
> back - because it's not as if entrprises are showing up with 
> developers to help - even though we ask. 
> https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird/Enterprise for example has a link 
> to https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird#Contributing

+1. Here's another one:

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-munich-rejected-steve-ballmer-and-kicked-microsoft-out-of-the-city/

Consider the lengths they went to and extraordinary incentives from MS 
they rejected to stay locked into their proprietary status quo. It would 
be remiss *not* to approach them (specifically Mr Peter Hofmann).

Cheers,
Dave





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