[Marketing-Public]An article against Firefox

Brian Burnham Brian Burnham <brianburnham at gmail.com>
Thu, 4 Nov 2004 14:28:09 -0600


Whew, here's a few points overlooked...

The new adopters that will contribute most to FF market share are
influencers, not internet novices. Most novice internet users, those
who do not know what a browser is, rely on more tech savvy users for
input. At this point in the adoption curve, every potential Firefox
user knows what a browser is. If they don't, we'll reach them through
others.

In part the evolution of the language on the home page will evolve as
our base of contributers evolves. I have never hacked out a like of
code in C, but I know what a preview release is. There is a danger in
dumbing-down language too soon, as we will abandon our most important
potential user base - early adopters and innovators.

There are ways we can improve the pages, without burning them to the
ground. At the risk of sounding like a business student, the purpose
of the web page boils down to articulating the benefits of Firefox
that differentiate it from IE in a language that resonates with a
target audience: the "installers".

These "installers" are different that the "users". My wife has never
installed Firefox, but uses it everyday. I'm not saying that changes
aren't warranted, some are. But I do think we need to identify and
target those most likely to install and influence.

B


On Thu, 04 Nov 2004 16:28:06 +0000, raiph <spam@temporalgyrus.com> wrote:
> thomas.alabor@mydiax.ch wrote:
> 
> >He's right, completely right!
> >
> >
> He's completely right that ff and its marketing wasn't ready for
> him to promote to all his blog visitors when he wrote that blog.
> 
> He's completely right that one can analyze one of the marketing
> pages and make it sound terrible, especially if you are ready to
> hear that it's terrible. And he's right there are some problems.
> 
> But I could analyze the same page and make it sound not too
> bad, especially if you are ready to hear that it's not terrible.
> (But, again, I agree there are *some* problems, and I would
> prefer that they be addressed.)
> 
> Logic is to be viewed with deep suspicion for these sorts of
> matters. Instead we need direct marketing discipline, which
> majors on empirical data. We should be doing continuous
> a/b splits and testing, testing, testing.
> 
> raiph
> 
> 
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Firefox: Rediscover the Web | http://ideatrust.org/firefox