<div dir="ltr"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">then we are epistemological nihilists with no criteria whatsoever on which to base our language design decisions and this mailing list would have no raison d'etre, since we would never be able to align on anything.</blockquote><div><br></div><div>That can be the case. Agreement is not required by the parties for a specification or any other document to be drafted, published, and even enforced. Even a treaty between nation-states. The populace can absolutely disagree with the authors of the document. One or more parties can sign but ignore some or all sections of one or all treaties between sovereigns.</div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">But this is no more a readability problem than the fact that one must have knowledge of the English worrds in a sentence in order for them to be "readable".</blockquote><div><br></div><div>That is indeed accurate. The engish language is equivocal, capable of being employed for deception; where there are, generally, more than one meaning for a given word or term. The artist E-40 uses the english language in their published work, though english professor at western academic institution would more than likely not have any clue as to what the english words that the artist creates, combines and uses mean whatsoever; that is, without one or more individuals that might not have a masters or doctorate in english supplied by an english-speaking institution of higher learning the would-be teacher what the words and terms used by the artist mean. The same holds true for the Ancient African Egyptian symbols and scripts, which are claimed to have been "deciphered" by Thomas Young, Champollion, et al. well over a thousand years after the conquest of the Ancient African Egyptians by Alexander of Macedonia. An entire discipline ("Egyptology") was created based on guessing and spurious manufacture after the fact. They have no clue what the words meant to the authors of the symbols, as the authors were never asked and the purported "Egyptologists" were never told the meanings of the sacred symbols by the authors and builders of the scripts and symbols. Some say "TMH" means "created white people" others say the word means "Lybian". Since the Ancient African Egyptian language had no vowels, the user supplies the vowels; the word can have Latin inserted to become "TaMaHu", though since the language is sacred, the Ancient African Egyptians never told or taught their conquerors the original meanings of the terms, and never will. No matter how many times whomever tries to claim they understand those scripts and symbols they can never verify their at best guesses at worse intentional deceit. The manufactured mythologies and outright fraud continue in any direction and field traversed when dealing with specifically english words and terms. Therefore, the english language is not an appropriate example to compare JavaScript, or any specified coding langauge to. </div><div><br></div><div>In any event, re-read the proposal. Am certainly not opposed to the JavaScript language being capable of golf by default. Is the gist of the proposal to substitute ```<span style="background-color:transparent;color:inherit;font-family:Menlo,Monaco,Consolas,"Courier New",monospace;font-size:14px;white-space:pre-wrap">|></span>```, and or ```.``` at ```<span style="background-color:transparent;color:inherit;font-family:Menlo,Monaco,Consolas,"Courier New",monospace;font-size:14px;white-space:pre-wrap">const getEmail = .contacts.email;``` </span>as the first character after ```=``` for `=>`, meaning the initial ```.``` following ```=``` is interpreted as a function call, equivalent to ```=>```? Can you include comments next to the examples at the OP detailing what each character is intended to mean in JavaScript, compared to the current specification of JavaScript?</div><div><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Sun, Jun 23, 2019 at 12:13 AM Bob Myers <<a href="mailto:rtm@gol.com">rtm@gol.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">The world is awash in subjectivity. <div><br></div><div>We can nevertheless hope to find broad agreement on at least a transitive ranking of attributes such as readability; if we don't think we can, then we are epistemological nihilists with no criteria whatsoever on which to base our language design decisions and this mailing list would have no raison d'etre, since we would never be able to align on anything.</div><div><br></div><div>However subjective the notion of readability, I think few would disagree that the first fragment below is more readable than the second.</div><div><br></div><div><div>```</div><div>.name</div><div>```</div><div><br></div><div>and</div><div><br></div><div>```</div><div>({name}) => name</div><div>```</div><div><br></div><div>The first is also more reliable by most measures, because it removes the possibility of misspelling one of the instances of ```name``` in the second, which we would prefer not to rely entirely opn type checkers or linters to pick up.</div><div><br></div><div>Yes, to read the first does require additional knowledge, namely of the fact that the syntax ```<dot>property``` denotes a function to retrieve the value of the property by that name. But this is no more a readability problem than the fact that one must have knowledge of the English worrds in a sentence in order for them to be "readable". Such knowledge is often referred to by terms such as "cognitive footprint". Yes, this proposal does have a cognitive footprint. But all language features have cognitive footprints, requiring that people writing and reading code using the feature have knowledge of the feature. The issue then becomes the *size* of the cognitive footprint in relation to the benefit--an equation both sides of which involve subjectivity...</div><div><br></div><div>Of course, I did not mean to imply that readability or reliability in and ot themselves are either necessary or sufficient for a new languge feature, There are many other aspects, as many as a dozen, which have been discussed and defined in earlier threads.</div><div><br></div><div>Bob</div></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Sat, Jun 22, 2019 at 12:08 PM guest271314 <<a href="mailto:guest271314@gmail.com" target="_blank">guest271314@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">> If the requirement is merely to write a function to pick properties, yes. If the requirement is to do that in a more concise, readable, reliable way, no.<div><br></div><div>The term "readable" is entirely subjective. As far as am aware there is no standard for "readable" (in any language, coding or not). Even if such criteria for "readable" did exist in some institutional document, no author of code (or anything else) is bound to recognize or adhere to any such subjective and arbitrary criteria. </div><div><br></div><div>What specific definition of "reliable" is being used, and what are the cases that demonstrates using destructing assignment is not "reliable"? </div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Sat, Jun 22, 2019 at 6:50 PM Bob Myers <<a href="mailto:rtm@gol.com" target="_blank">rtm@gol.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Sat, Jun 22, 2019 at 10:59 AM guest271314 <<a href="mailto:guest271314@gmail.com" target="_blank">guest271314@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">Does not destructuring assignment provide a means to achieve the requirement?</div></blockquote><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div dir="ltr">If the requirement is merely to write a function to pick properties, yes. If the requirement is to do that in a more concise, readable, reliable way, no.</div></div>
</blockquote></div>
</blockquote></div>
</blockquote></div>