<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">> In any event, re-read the proposal. Am certainly not opposed to the JavaScript language being capable of golf by default. Is the gist of the proposal to substitute ```<span style="background-color:transparent;color:inherit;font-family:Menlo,Monaco,Consolas,"Courier New",monospace;font-size:14px;white-space:pre-wrap">|></span>```, and or ```.``` at ```<span style="background-color:transparent;color:inherit;font-family:Menlo,Monaco,Consolas,"Courier New",monospace;font-size:14px;white-space:pre-wrap">const getEmail = .contacts.email;``` </span>as the first character after ```=``` for `=>`, meaning the initial ```.``` following ```=``` is interpreted as a function call, equivalent to ```=>```? Can you include comments next to the examples at the OP detailing what each character is intended to mean in JavaScript, compared to the current specification of JavaScript?</div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div>This proposal has nothing to do with ```|>```. It is a variation of dot notation, the classic notation ```o.p``` that has been a feature of JS since its inception, to treat ```.p``` as a function (not a  function call) taking one argument and returning the value of the property ```p``` in that object. To put it a different way, if the object normally preceding the dot is omitted, the construct is treated as a property picking function. It is not a matter of the dot necessarily having to follow an equal sign, or having some special meaning only that context; ```.p``` not preceded by an object is a function regardless of the context. To my knowledge, there is no ambiguity in this notation. In other words, there is no case in which a dot not following an expression and followed by an identifier is anything other than a syntax error at present--please correct me if I'm wrong.</div><div><br></div><div>Although not mentioned in the brief propsoal, there is no logical reason that the analogous property access syntax ```.[prop]``` could not be allowed. There also does not seem to any reason to prohibit the use of this construct for arrays, so ```.[0]``` could be the "head" function people have been talking about for years.</div><div><br></div><div>Bob</div></div>