<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class="">@T.J., no respectable employer would hire an expensive, competent javascript-programmer, if they didn’t have the intention of leveraging him/her to write integration-code interfacing with some kind of web-ui.  otherwise, it makes more business-sense to hire cheaper and more-plentiful competent java-programmers.</div><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On Feb 20, 2018, at 3:47 PM, T.J. Crowder <<a href="mailto:tj.crowder@farsightsoftware.com" class="">tj.crowder@farsightsoftware.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><div dir="ltr" class=""><div class="">On Tue, Feb 20, 2018 at 8:34 AM, kai zhu <<a href="mailto:kaizhu256@gmail.com" class="">kaizhu256@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</div><div class="">></div><div class="">> @aleksander, javascript was not designed to validate functions and</div><div class="">> class-instances passed around inside a silo'd nodejs-process.  its</div><div class="">> designed to solve UX-problems</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Again: This myth is false. It doesn't matter how often you repeat it, it remains false. JavaScript is a general-purpose programming language just like any of several other general-purpose programming languages, your attempts to relegate it to the browser notwithstanding.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">-- T.J. Crowder</div></div>
</div></blockquote></div><br class=""></body></html>