<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 10:20 AM, Alex Vincent <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ajvincent@gmail.com" target="_blank">ajvincent@gmail.com</a>></span> quoted:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div><div><div><div><br></div></div></div></div><div><div><div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div><div><div>-- <br><div class="m_-3278670950527746265gmail_signature">"The first step in confirming there is a bug in someone else's work is confirming there are no bugs in your own."<br>-- Alexander J. Vincent, June 30, 2001</div></div></div></div></font></span></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>I rarely comment on these incidental aphorisms, but this one is so wrong that it is worth pointing out. You can confirm the existence of many bugs by </div><div>  * demonstration via failing test case, </div><div>  * finding the bug, </div><div>  * having a plausible explanation for why it is incorrect, </div><div>  * writing a fix with a plausible explanation for why it fixes the problem, and</div><div>  * demonstrating that the fix repairs the demonstrated test case. </div><div><br></div><div>However hard this is, it is vastly easier than confirming that there are no bugs in your own code.</div></div><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature">    Cheers,<br>    --MarkM</div>
</div></div>