<div dir="ltr">If you are referring to the standard ECMA-2 for a subset of ALGOL 60, this was not a "standard for a programming language", but rather for a particular ill-advised crippling of ALGOL, which not only removed `own` (sort of static) variables, but much more importantly removed the key feature of recursion, and bizarrely made identifiers unique only up to six characters (!), probably at the behest of some manufacturer that had 6-byte words, allowing them to claim that their implementation was "conformant" to this truncated "standard". Hardly one of their best moments.<div><br></div><div>I have fond memories of ALGOL, in which I wrote a symbolic differentiation program one summer during high school, on a B8500 machine at Case Institute of Technology.</div><div><br></div><div>I will leave it up to historians to confirm that ALGOL was never standardized by a standards body; there was just the iconic "Report on the Algorithmic Language ALGOL 60".</div><div><br></div><div>--</div><div>Bob</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jun 16, 2016 at 2:13 AM, Isiah Meadows <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:isiahmeadows@gmail.com" target="_blank">isiahmeadows@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><p dir="ltr">Didn't know that. Nice to know! :-) </p>
<br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Wed, Jun 15, 2016, 11:48 Allen Wirfs-Brock <<a href="mailto:allen@wirfs-brock.com" target="_blank">allen@wirfs-brock.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><br><div><blockquote type="cite"><div>On Jun 14, 2016, at 8:57 PM, Isiah Meadows <<a href="mailto:isiahmeadows@gmail.com" target="_blank">isiahmeadows@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</div><br><div>Just an educated guess (I'm not actually involved in any part of this effort - just a random person subscribed to this list), but I think it's because of ECMA itself. Granted, TC39 has already noted that this one doesn't exactly fit well with the rest of their framework, because of the constant and frequent input, and because the software industry moves a lot faster than the hardware and electrical engineering industries (that's most of what ECMA deals with). <br></div></blockquote></div><br></div><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div>Note that Ecma has a long history of developing software related standards. In fact the second standard issued by Ecma was for a programming language.</div><div> <a href="http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Standardwithdrawn.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Standardwithdrawn.htm</a> </div><div><br></div></div></blockquote></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
es-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:es-discuss@mozilla.org">es-discuss@mozilla.org</a><br>
<a href="https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/es-discuss" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/es-discuss</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>