<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto"><div>I don't think that prevents a caller from adversarially injecting - and then catching - faults into a callee in such a way that the caller can control which part of the callee runs and which part doesn't. The ability to catch the fault is what causes the security issues, since the caller can keep running even when the callee was forced to give up. </div><div id="AppleMailSignature"><br></div><div id="AppleMailSignature">Being able to detect and act upon low memory conditions is helpful in other ways, but I don't think it prevents the bad scenario from happening. </div><div id="AppleMailSignature"><br>-Filip</div><div><br>On Sep 27, 2015, at 4:47 PM, Ron Waldon <<a href="mailto:jokeyrhyme@gmail.com">jokeyrhyme@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><div dir="ltr">Android has an older onLowMemory() callback and a newer onTrimMemory() callback:<div>- <a href="http://developer.android.com/reference/android/content/ComponentCallbacks.html#onLowMemory">http://developer.android.com/reference/android/content/ComponentCallbacks.html#onLowMemory</a>()</div><div>- <a href="http://developer.android.com/reference/android/content/ComponentCallbacks2.html#onTrimMemory(int">http://developer.android.com/reference/android/content/ComponentCallbacks2.html#onTrimMemory(int</a>)</div><div><br></div><div>iOS has something similar as well.</div><div><br></div><div>Is making these available in ECMAScript proper or an annex a potential solution to this class of problem?</div></div>
</div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>es-discuss mailing list</span><br><span><a href="mailto:es-discuss@mozilla.org">es-discuss@mozilla.org</a></span><br><span><a href="https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/es-discuss">https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/es-discuss</a></span><br></div></blockquote></body></html>