<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">Le 26 avr. 2015 à 00:58, Kevin Smith <<a href="mailto:zenparsing@gmail.com" class="">zenparsing@gmail.com</a>> a écrit :</div><div class=""><div dir="ltr" class=""><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr" class=""><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div class=""><br class=""></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div class="">If we used "x.constructor" to determine the actual constructor, then someone could just change the "constructor" property for x and fool someone who wrote "C.resolve(x)" and expected to get an instance of C back.</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div><div>Note that if you want to protect yourself against tampering the `constructor` property, you should seriously consider to protect yourself against tampering the `then` property. That means that you should at the very least execute `preventExtensions` on your promise anyway.</div><div><br class=""></div><div>—Claude</div></div></body></html>