<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Jan 21, 2015, at 11:03 AM, Brendan Eich wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>Allen Wirfs-Brock wrote:<br><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#006312">...</font></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">I agree, that the anti-spoofing is the most questionable part of the design and I would be fine with loosing it. But is it really questionable enough that we can't live with what is specified.  What is the fatal flaw. What does it actually harm?<br></blockquote><br>This is not the question to ask, since there won't be obvious fatal flaws in lots of things we still need to agree upon, yet the cumulative complexity will hide flaws. We need to reduce complexity to reduce risk of something bad (however non-fatal). Many small wounds add up. I know this too well from JS, which barely survived its early trials.<br><br>Let's lose what we can, to avoid letting loose the complexity/risk-hounds ;-). How would you cut anti-spoofing?<br></div></blockquote><div><br></div>By simply deleting step 17 of <a href="http://people.mozilla.org/~jorendorff/es6-draft.html#sec-object.prototype.tostring">http://people.mozilla.org/~jorendorff/es6-draft.html#sec-object.prototype.tostring</a> <br></div><div><br></div><div>Allen</div></body></html>