<div dir="ltr">On 21 January 2015 at 01:28, Mark S. Miller <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:erights@google.com" target="_blank">erights@google.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>* Pages are created by people who don't really understand the code they are modifying, nor the semantics of the language it is written in. They simply keep fiddling with it until it no longer seems to be broken, and then ship it. I used to have more mixed feelings about this until I realized that it is *precisely* how I use LaTeX.</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>On a tangent, but I find this analogy questionable. LaTeX programs are normally supposed to have exactly one possible, fixed output, so you can trivially do "exhaustive testing". (Unless you are writing a package, but then you're hopefully beyond fiddling.) Not so with dynamic web pages.</div><div><br></div><div>/Andreas</div><div><br></div></div></div></div>