<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><div><div><br></div>
<div>// the same, advancing to the first `yield` at instantiation</div><div>class echo2 extends echo {</div><div>    construct(...args) {</div><div>        let iter = super(...args)</div><div>        iter.next()</div><div>
        return iter</div><div>    }</div><div>}</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Nice pattern!  Would this also work?</div><div><br></div><div>    var skipFirst = genFn => function*(...args) { </div>
<div>        var iter = genFn(...args);</div><div>        iter.next();</div><div>        yield * iter;</div><div>    };</div><div><br></div><div>    var echo2 = skipFirst(echo);</div><div><br></div><div>If we have decorators, then we can write:</div>
<div><br></div><div>    @skipFirst</div><div>    function echo() { /*_*/ }</div><div><br></div><div>which is fairly pleasant.</div><div><br></div><div>Still, it seems like we're papering over a hole.  In principle, why shouldn't we be able to access the first next argument?</div>
<div><br></div></div></div></div>