<p dir="ltr">The </p>
<p dir="ltr">    import 'foo' <br>
    let foo = this.get('foo')</p>
<p dir="ltr">Is less of a hassle if you only need it for when you have default and named exports and need the module object. <br>
</p>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Jun 25, 2014 7:48 AM, "Kevin Smith" <<a href="mailto:zenparsing@gmail.com">zenparsing@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br type="attribution"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><p dir="ltr">But if modules were said to have a default default export that was an object with all the exports that could be overridden then that's different.</p>


</blockquote><div>I see where you're coming from, and honestly I don't have a better argument against a default default.  (I actually tried to argue for that once upon a time.)<br></div><div><br></div><div>In any case, I still think the design is not complete unless you have *some* way to access the module instance object (even in the case where the default has been "overridden"), so we still need ModuleImport.</div>


<div><br></div></div></div></div>
</blockquote></div>