<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jun 25, 2014 at 2:59 PM, Kevin Smith <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:zenparsing@gmail.com" target="_blank">zenparsing@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div class="">Correct me if I'm wrong, but the perspective says: "why would I need to import the multiple-exports if I'm specifically overriding the exports with a default?  Having a way to import both the default and multiple-exports is silly and confusing."</div>
</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>For my part, my personal perspective is, "I have a module named `foo`.  I want to write `foo.bar` to get the export named bar.  I don't care *what* `foo` is.  Perhaps its a function object for backwards-compatibility.  Perhaps it's a module object because of some circular dependency.  Perhaps it's a plain object.  To me it's just a namespace.  Please let me use the same import syntax regardless.  In exchange, I promise never to use bare `foo` in my code."</div>
<div><br></div><div>There are a couple of different solutions; default-default is one of those.</div></div> --scott</div></div>