<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Jun 18, 2014, at 11:18 AM, Jason Orendorff wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div><blockquote type="cite">If so it seems like the question of whether to keep or drop the `new super` syntax is 100% orthogonal to your proposal.<br></blockquote><br>I think that's right. I assumed the use cases for `new super` must be<br>something to do with how objects are constructed now, but on<br>reflection I don't know what the use cases are.</div></span></blockquote></div><br><div>It's there now mostly just for syntactic consistency.  You can say 'new this' so why wouldn't you be able to say 'new super'.  It probably has limited use cases but it is one of those things that falls out of the overall expression syntax and I think if somebody does have a use case it would be surprising that it isn't allowed.</div><div><br></div><div>allen</div></body></html>