<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Jan 11, 2014 at 12:24 PM, Andrea Giammarchi <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:andrea.giammarchi@gmail.com" target="_blank">andrea.giammarchi@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">I would like to see some Rick or David example about the "expected to be enumerable".<div>

<br></div><div>If that's about knowing if a class is native or not, looping with a for/in its prototype or any instance does not seem to mean anything reliable since even native methods can be redefined and made enumerable.</div>

</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Making concise method definitions default to enumerable: true had _nothing_ to do with classes and everything to do with code that *consumes* objects with concise method definitions. Refactoring this: </div>

<div><br></div><div>  var o = {</div><div>    method: function() {</div><div>    }</div><div>  };</div><div><br></div><div>To this: </div><div><br></div><div>  var o = {</div><div>    method() {</div><div>    }</div><div>

  };</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Should absolutely not change the resulting behaviour of a for-in loop over o's properties. I don't know why Allen said that for-in has been deprecated in favor of for-of, since the latter doesn't imply iteration over the properties of a plain object. That's not going away.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Rick</div></div></div></div>