<div dir="ltr">On Mon, Jun 24, 2013 at 5:00 PM, Mark S. Miller <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:erights@google.com" target="_blank">erights@google.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="im">On Mon, Jun 24, 2013 at 4:46 PM, Axel Rauschmayer <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:axel@rauschma.de" target="_blank">axel@rauschma.de</a>></span> wrote:<br>
</div><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div>Sorry for bringing this point up, again. It is a minor point, but details matter if ECMAScript 6 is supposed to feel consistent.</div>

<div><br></div><div>In general, I like how ECMAScript 6 has evolved functions. Before, functions played three roles:</div><div><br></div><div>1. Constructor</div><div>2. Method</div><div>3. Non-method function (where you want lexical `this`)</div>

<div><br></div><div>In ES6, we have classes for #1 and method definitions for #2 (in both object literals and class literals). Furthermore, arrow functions replace function expressions and have lexical `this`. What is missing is a function declaration with lexical `this`.</div>

<div><br></div><div>What’s the best way to solve this and to eliminate the pitfall of dynamic `this` (at least for beginners)? Tell people to const-bind arrow functions?</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></div><div>
IMO, yes.</div><div class="im">
<div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div> We’d lose hoisting, though.</div></div></blockquote>

<div><br></div></div><div>yes. I don't think this will actually be a problem in practice.</div><div class="im"><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div> I also wouldn’t want to lose the symmetry function declaration/generator declaration and method definition/generator method definition.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></div>
<div>
I do sometimes wish there was a natural place to put a "*" on an arrow function, and sometimes I don't wish it. In any case, it's not gonna happen in ES6.</div><div class="im"><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><br></div><div>IMO, we need a consistent story for ES6 in this area.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></div><div>const foo = (a,b) => a+b;</div></div></div></div></blockquote>
</div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">For simple procedures-like function still<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">function doAction() {<br>  ...<br>}<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">looks more familiar for programmers than<br>
<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">const doAction = () => {}<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">(notice also this ugly empty parameters thing = () =).<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">So I wouldn't kill function declarations and left the dynamic this there (which still can be used).<br>
</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">=> functions are mostly for one-time use, and short functions (even if the have blocks). To avoid spaghetti code, usually if the function is big it's moved outside instead of using in-place.<br>
<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Dmitry<br></div></div>