<div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:10pt"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style>On 19 December 2012 21:29, James Burke <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jrburke@gmail.com" target="_blank">jrburke@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

</div><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">

This is illustrated by an example from Dave Herman, for a language<br></div>
(sorry I do not recall which), where developers ended up using "_t",<br>
or some convention like that, to indicate a single export value that<br>
they did not want to name. As I recall, that language had something<br>
more like "bindings" than "variables". That would be ugly to see a<br>
"_t" convention in JS (IMO).<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>That language would be ML (or its Ocaml dialect), which happens to have the most advanced module system of all languages by far. The convention is to use "t" as an internal type name, and I've never heard anybody complain about it. ;)  It's an acquired taste, I suppose.</div>

<div style><br></div><div style>It's also worth noting that Dave's comparison is somewhat inaccurate. The convention is used to name the _primary_ abstract type defined by a module, not the _only_ export -- modules with only one export practically _never_ show up in ML programming, which perhaps is a relevant data point in itself.</div>

<div style></div></div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra" style>/Andreas</div><div class="gmail_extra" style><br></div></div></div>