if it's about iterating you have forEach which does not iterate over non assigned indexes ... this looks like you want a new feature with an ES5 method as filter is so that you can use an ES3 for loop after ... <div><br>
</div><div>I mean, you have forEach, map, etc to iterate valid indexes, why would you need that?</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Nov 12, 2012 at 1:24 PM, Asen Bozhilov <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:asen.bozhilov@gmail.com" target="_blank">asen.bozhilov@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi, 
<div><br></div><div>Array.prototype.filter could be used to convert sparse to dense array, e.g.</div><div><br></div><div>[1,,,,,2,,,,,3].filter(Boolean.bind(null, true)); //[1, 2, 3] </div><div><br></div><div>Would be pretty straightforward if built-in filter could be called without callback function and returns a dense array. </div>

<div>I guess the engines will optimize that and library authors could gracefully iterate over index properties of arrays without checking for existance.  </div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
es-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:es-discuss@mozilla.org">es-discuss@mozilla.org</a><br>
<a href="https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/es-discuss" target="_blank">https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/es-discuss</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>