<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Oct 17, 2012, at 8:32 PM, Rick Waldron wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">
    <div id="reply-content"><span style="color: rgb(160, 160, 168); font-size: 16.5px; ">On Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at 11:18 PM, Axel Rauschmayer wrote:</span></div>
    <blockquote type="cite" style="border-left-style:solid;border-width:1px;margin-left:0px;padding-left:10px;">
        <div id="quoted-message-content"><div><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=us-ascii"><div><blockquote type="cite"><div>I've always viewed enumerability as an implied intent of sharing. Copying non-enumerable properties is a violation of my expectations (I assure you, I'm not alone)</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>That is an interesting point. Does the prevention of sharing ever occur in practice (apart from hiding the methods of built-in prototype objects from for...in)?</div></div><br></div></div></blockquote><div><span style="font-size: 16.5px; ">In my experience, this is extraordinarily rare (so much that I can't think of any relevant code bases)</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 17px;"><br></span></div></blockquote><br></div><div>Pardon, I missed and cannot find what is Object.assign(...), seems it's not from the latest draft. Is it just defining properties (via Object.defineProperty) on from a source to destination object? Like old-good Object.extend(...)?</div><div><br></div><div>But from just an abstract viewpoint -- we could control non-enumerable properties with a boolean flag (includeNonEnumerable).</div><div><br></div><div>Dmitry</div><br></body></html>