<div class="gmail_quote">2012/9/26 David Bruant <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:bruant.d@gmail.com" target="_blank">bruant.d@gmail.com</a>></span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

  
    
  
  <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div>With the current design, however, the DOM can figure out whether the
    end target of a proxy chain is a genuine DOM object and potentially
    accept it as Node in the DOM tree if that's what the end target is.</div></div></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">

    I can't tell whether it's a good or bad idea, whether it's worth the
    implementation cost, but the proxy design shift has re-opened that
    door.</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I agree it's tempting, but it's a dangerous road in the sense that it might pierce membranes (i.e. membranes having no place to stand when some built-in method inadvertently reaches into the built-in target object and exposes some object that it references). I'm not sure if there would be any such case in e.g. the DOM, but if we go down this road, it may become an issue in the future.</div>
<div><br></div><div>I agree we should strive to allow proxies in as much places as possible, but I don't feel like the proxy design would be broken if there are a few cases where this is not possible. Any system must eventually bottom out at some point.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Cheers,</div><div>Tom</div></div>