i mean a set of rules should have its logic.<div><br></div><div>true > "azerty"'  //false </div><div>true == "azerty"' //false</div><div>true >= "azerty"' //  if here is true .   is no wonder ?</div>
<div><div><br></div><div> <br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2012/9/25 David Bruant <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:bruant.d@gmail.com" target="_blank">bruant.d@gmail.com</a>></span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Le 25/09/2012 12:13, Frank Quan a écrit :<br>
<div class="im">> Hi, Brendan, thank you for reply.<br>
><br>
><br>
> I mean in common understanding, "a>=b" always have the same result<br>
> with " a>b || a==b ".<br>
</div>Common understanding assumes a and b are numbers. I personally don't<br>
know if there is a common understanding of what 'true > "azerty"' could<br>
mean.<br>
<div class="im"><br>
> But I noticed that in ES5/ES3, there are several cases breaking this rule.<br>
><br>
> See the following:<br>
><br>
> null == 0 // false<br>
> null > 0 // false<br>
><br>
> null >= 0 // true<br>
><br>
> I was wondering if this is by design.<br>
><br>
> And, is it possible to have some change in future versions of ES?<br>
</div>Regrettably, no. As a complement to Brendan's response, I recommand you<br>
to read the following paragraph<br>
<a href="https://github.com/DavidBruant/ECMAScript-regrets#web-technologies-are-ugly-and-there-is-no-way-back" target="_blank">https://github.com/DavidBruant/ECMAScript-regrets#web-technologies-are-ugly-and-there-is-no-way-back</a><br>

Changing this in a future version of ECMAScript would "break the web"<br>
(break websites that rely on this broken behavior)<br>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
David<br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br></div></div>