<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">Le 05/07/2012 17:19, Patrik Stutz a
      écrit :<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CACUXN66ycsWufejTEg6QaPp4M2uCbnz=dxTSdQYXpu4hKVMHkQ@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite"><font color="#000000"><font><font
            face="verdana,sans-serif"></font></font></font>BUT:
      interestingly, the import keyword also seems to be synchronous.
      So, I think behind the scenes there still would have to be
      something like a "delay" function to make it non-blocking. Or am I
      missing something?</blockquote>
    The 'import' keyword is synchronous, but in a different than node.js
    'require':<br>
    <br>
        var a = require('a.js');<br>
        var b = require('b.js');<br>
        var c = require('c.js');<br>
    <br>
    Here, a.js is fetched, parsed and executed, then b.js is fetched,
    parsed and executed, then c.js is fetched, parsed and executed. In
    that order sequentially.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
        import a from 'a.js'<br>
        import b from 'b.js'<br>
        import c from 'c.js'<br>
    <br>
    Here, a.js, b.js and c.js are fetched and parsed in parallel, but
    executed in the order they are declared. If other imports are found
    in parsing phase, these can be fetched and parsed in the background.<br>
    The most important part being parallel and in depth fetch since
    network is the performance bottleneck in web applications.<br>
    <br>
    If you want delayed module loading (with a custom delay), you can
    always fetch the scripts yourself and eval them.<br>
    <br>
    David<br>
  </body>
</html>