<div class="gmail_quote">On 27 June 2012 17:40, Sam Tobin-Hochstadt <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:samth@ccs.neu.edu" target="_blank">samth@ccs.neu.edu</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
What request do you send to ask for multiple modules?</blockquote><div><br>We send a request like    /methods/modules?root=pathto/mystuff&id=/sha256&id=/auth/password<br><br>The client canonicalizes each CommonJS dependency to its full (canonical) path and tells the server where the module system root is.  The server then examines each module last modification time, comparing against the Last-Modified-Since header. Dependent modules are likewise examined recursively. If any module is newer, all of the modules are sent, otherwise, an HTTP 304 response is returned and the browser reads all modules from its cache.<br>
 <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">And does this work for the non-cached situation (that is,<br>
how did the client get to the place where 304 was the right thing --<br>
by doing multiple requests previously?)?<br>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"></font></span></blockquote><div><br>Precisely. <br><br>This pattern is obviously more useful for some sites than others.  But I think it's interesting enough to mention.<br>
<br clear="all">Wes</div></div><br>-- <br>Wesley W. Garland<br>Director, Product Development<br>PageMail, Inc.<br>+1 613 542 2787 x 102<br>