<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"></head><body><br>It's already the case that the ordering of most [[Put]] and [[Get]] calls in those algotitms are observable. Other internal methods are observable via attribute manipulation side-effects that cause downstream internal methods to throw. <div><br></div><div>I don't thing Proxies will make things much worse.  That said, reviews and critiques of existing algorithms are most welcome.</div><div><br></div><div>Allen<br><br><br><br><span style="font-size:100%">Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab</span> </div><br>David Bruant <bruant.d@gmail.com> wrote:<br>Hi,<br><br>Today, I came across a test on Firefox test suite [1]. This test<br>verifies that on the proxy, the traps gets called in the right order<br>according to the ES5 algorithm of Array.prototype.splice.<br>Seeing this test made me realize that as soon as proxy gets in the spec<br>and implemented in web browsers, every single built-in function<br>algorithm will be observable, so will need to be frozen while before<br>proxies, they didn't need to (which allowed internal refactorings).<br><br>This seems to be the last time major refactorings can be applied to<br>these algorithms. Are they ready to be frozen?<br><br>Maybe it would be worth having tests for this in test262 as an attempt<br>to ensure interoperability for all these algorithms when used in<br>combination with proxies?<br><br>David<br><br>[1]<br>http://mxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source/js/src/jit-test/tests/basic/splice-check-steps.js<br>_______________________________________________<br>es-discuss mailing list<br>es-discuss@mozilla.org<br>https://mail.mozilla.org/listinfo/es-discuss<br><br> </body>