<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Mar 23, 2012, at 2:48 AM, Andreas Rossberg wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div class="gmail_quote">On 23 March 2012 08:42, Claus Reinke <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:claus.reinke@talk21.com">claus.reinke@talk21.com</a>></span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">


- would it make sense to name the constructor after the class<br>
   (avoiding 'constructor' and 'new')?<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>-1.</div><div><br></div><div>I always considered this a bad choice of C++-derived class systems. It violates Don't-repeat-yourself, and thus is annoying e.g. when you rename things. It is less searchable and less readable locally, because you have to take the name of the surrounding class into account to decide what kind of declaration you are looking at. And it doesn't scale to anonymous classes, in case these ever become an option for ES</div></div></blockquote><br></div><div><br></div><div>Not to mention that there is no particular reason than instance method can't have the same name as its class:</div><div><br></div><div>class Point {} {</div><div>   constructor(x,y) {</div><div>      thls.x = x;</div><div>      this.y = y;</div><div>    }</div><div>    Point () {</div><div>       return this</div><div>    }</div><div>}</div><div><br></div><div>Allen</div><br></body></html>