<div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Mar 20, 2012 at 3:58 PM, Kevin Smith <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:khs4473@gmail.com">khs4473@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="gmail_quote"><div><div><div>Yeah - Java enforces this by making it an error if a call to super happens after any other statement.</div>

</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></div><div>Yes - and "magically" interleaving instance field initializers in between the super call and the rest of the constructor body.  Taking this approach would make desugaring more complicated.  I'm not "voting" either way though.</div>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">
<div><br></div></font></span></div></blockquote><div> </div><div>I wasn't suggesting we do it the Java way, I was just pointing out that Java does something along these lines as well. Personally, I think JS is a little too freewheeling to have that kind of restriction. I say let the chips fall. Super can be called wherever in the constructor. Something like your syntax can be added later to make it easier to "do the right thing". I would say that there should be no more restrictions than what Allen has shown in his <| examples. I don't think he has mentioned any, so I wouldn't have any either.</div>
<div><br></div><div>- Russ</div></div>