<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    Le 16/02/2012 03:32, Peter Seliger a écrit :
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAAD5ug6Mr+obyFdYx8McZWct9EuyfhRJ_-SSJr511a0MDZY-7A@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div class="gmail_quote">
        <div class="im">
          <blockquote class="gmail_quote"
style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><br>
            that looks like a wrap to me ... what's the connection with
            bind() exactly?
            <div><br>
            </div>
            <div>Also not sure you are talking about dispatched Events
              ("before", "around", "after") or some other topic</div>
          </blockquote>
          <div><br>
          </div>
        </div>
        <div>Sorry for not having pointed it out clearly enough.</div>
        <div>I'm talking about before/after/around as they are</div>
        <div>known from Aspect Oriented Programming.</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>The connection to bind, I thought, was that all of</div>
        <div>them do modify other methods. Therefore I did</div>
        <div>choose the above subject instead of mentioning</div>
        <div>AOP in the first place.<br>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    Can you show some examples of what it would look like?<br>
    Is there a widespread use of such constructs in JavaScript? I can't
    recall having seen such things.<br>
    <br>
    A while ago, I did start a library using "before", for a sort of
    runtime type checking (replacing a function with another function
    that does the same thing, but with type checking for both input and
    output). Having started such a thing, I soon realized it was hard to
    use my library in a non-intrusive way (probably a good use case for
    macros).<br>
    <br>
    I'm not sure to what extent my experience reflects how the general
    use case for methods modifiers in JS would be, though.<br>
    <br>
    David<br>
  </body>
</html>