<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Jan 16, 2012, at 11:09 AM, Brendan Eich wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">
<meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252" http-equiv="Content-Type">
<div text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">With completion values as 
In ES1-5, not even depending on 
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://wiki.ecmascript.org/doku.php?id=harmony:completion_reform">http://wiki.ecmascript.org/doku.php?id=harmony:completion_reform</a>, it 
might be enough to say:<br>
<br>
<br>
<div style="font-family: monospace;">   foo  {||</div>
<div style="font-family: monospace;">       exit: {</div>
<div style="font-family: monospace;">            ...</div>
<div style="font-family: monospace;">            if (...) {<br>
                "early";<br>
                break exit;<br>
            }<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: monospace;">            ...</div>
<div style="font-family: monospace;">        }</div>
<div style="font-family: monospace;">   }</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yeah, I thought of that too, although it's unfortunately awfully obscure. It was also the motivation behind <a href="http://wiki.ecmascript.org/doku.php?id=strawman:return_to_label">http://wiki.ecmascript.org/doku.php?id=strawman:return_to_label</a></div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">IINM this would work. Sugaring it using 'with' looks nice -- always 
tempting to re-use 'with'.<br></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>A clever idea, and more pleasant-looking than the syntax of my old return_to_label strawman. But it does have an ASI hazard:</div><div><br></div><div>    break exit</div><div>    with "early"</div><div><br></div>That might be what /be meant by:</div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">I have some angst about loss of a hunk of code running "break L" up 
against " with (E)\nS" where E is an expression and S is a statement and
 the two came from a bone-fide with statement later in the unmangled 
source.</div></blockquote><br></div><div>Dave</div><div><br></div></body></html>