<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#ffffff">
    On 24.08.2011 0:39, Allen Wirfs-Brock wrote:
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:0087535B-57E7-496A-8F60-D9CDB1831FCF@wirfs-brock.com"
      type="cite">
      <div><br>
      </div>
      <div>
        <div>On Aug 9, 2011, at 1:03 PM, Dmitry A. Soshnikov wrote:</div>
        <blockquote type="cite">
          <div><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#000000"><br>
            </font>And what about this method Object.getMethods(...),
            Object.getMethodNames(...). Do we need it? I think it can be
            useful (since methods can be non-enumerable, and
            Object.keys(...) won't help, and after
            Object.getOwnPropertyNames(...) you have to manually filter
            them when `typeof` is "function")<br>
            <br>
          </div>
        </blockquote>
        <br>
      </div>
      <div>I'm don't really see the that they are needed enough to build
        these in when they can be synthesized pretty easily.  What is
        the justification for these and not others such as
        getAccessorProperties, getDataProperties,
        getNonWritableProperties, etc.  </div>
      <div><br>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    Maybe, why not? `Object.methods` is just standard in some languages
    (e.g. Ruby, `foo.instance_methods`). Yes, all of yours listed above
    could be either built-in or self-implemented, don't know how often
    they are needed IRL. This topic follows the recent near topic with
    doc-comments of functions. The same, playing with a new language in
    console it's the best just to type e.g. `foo.methods` (like in Ruby)
    and to see directly the list of methods to which the object
    responds. Besides, perhaps they can be used in other meta-level
    programming, but the initial idea seems studying the language in the
    console and playing with objects (not sure though whether it's a
    sound reason to be accepted for standardization).<br>
    <br>
    Dmitry.<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>