<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Jul 10, 2011, at 10:40 AM, Dmitry A. Soshnikov wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">
<div text="#000000" bgcolor="#ffffff">
    On 10.07.2011 21:23, Brendan Eich wrote:
    <blockquote cite="mid:D7215BCE-3CF6-427B-B937-8063CDCCC90F@mozilla.com" type="cite">
      <div>
        <div>On Jul 10, 2011, at 10:18 AM, Rick Waldron wrote:</div>
        <br class="Apple-interchange-newline">
        <blockquote type="cite">The more I think about it, I still can't
          come up with any really exciting use cases where <a moz-do-not-send="true" href="http://Array.of/" type="url">Array.of</a> would
          outshine anything that already exists. I say strike it from
          the wishlist.<br>
        </blockquote>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        Higher-order programming with Array as constructing-function
        bites back for the single-number-argument case. That's where
        Array.of helps.</div>
      <div><br>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    You mean when `Array` itself is passed as an argument?<br>
    <br>
    var o = (function (ArrayConstructor, ...rest) {<br>
        return ArrayConstructor(...rest);<br>
    })(Array, 10, 20, 30);<br></div></blockquote><div><br></div>Yes. Now consider the case where you leave out the 20 and 30.</div><div><br></div><div>/be</div></body></html>