<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Jul 10, 2011, at 10:32 AM, Allen Wirfs-Brock wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Jul 10, 2011, at 10:23 AM, Brendan Eich wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Jul 10, 2011, at 10:18 AM, Rick Waldron wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">The more I think about it, I still can't come up with any really exciting use cases where <a href="http://Array.of/" type="url">Array.of</a> would outshine anything that already exists. I say strike it from the wishlist.<br></blockquote><div><br></div>Higher-order programming with Array as constructing-function bites back for the single-number-argument case. That's where Array.of helps.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yes, if you actually need to pass Array.of as a function argument.  Of course if we have block lambdas you could just say:</div><div><br></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="'Courier New'">     hof({|a|[a]})</font></div><div>instead of</div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="'Courier New'">     hof(Array.of)</font></div></div></div></blockquote><br></div><div>You know I <3 block-lambdas ;-).</div><div><br></div><div>/be</div><br></body></html>