On Mon, May 23, 2011 at 8:51 AM, Brendan Eich <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:brendan@mozilla.com">brendan@mozilla.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<div class="im">Class syntax is like a lint brush for such features. If we add it, it will accrete more semantics (with unambiguous syntax, I hope) over time. This is just inevitable, in my view. It makes me want to resist classes and look at smaller and more direct fixes for the two known prototypal hazards.</div>

</blockquote><div><br></div><div>I think you're point is valid, though a shade more negatively tinged than I'd like. :)</div><div><br></div><div>Class syntax probably will/would gain additional features over time, but I'd like to believe that it would only gain features that we all agree are useful and worth their weight in text. I have good faith that we won't just start slapping new stuff in there willy-nilly. Given that ES's evolution is consensus-based (and it's based on the consensus of people who all like that ES is small and simple!) and dependent on clients upgrading, I'm not too worried that things are going to go all Algol-68 on us.</div>

<div><br></div><div>What I <i>do</i> worry about is that ES won't "scale" as quickly as the problems we're solving with it. People are writing <i>huge</i> codebases in Javascript now (Gmail! Flickr! Google Maps!) The only way programs of that size can be managed by our primitive monkey brains is if we can write code at a higher level of abstraction. For me, declarative class syntax is a really helpful tool for doing that.</div>

<div><br></div><div>It's not just about less typing. It's about less distance between intent and code. That distance has to be covered by everyone reading code, so I figure the more we can shorten it, the more quickly we can get things done.</div>

<div><br></div><div>- bob</div><div><br></div></div>