<div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Apr 16, 2010 at 4:18 PM, Asen Bozhilov <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:asen.bozhilov@gmail.com">asen.bozhilov@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
2010/4/16, Dmitry A. Soshnikov &lt;<a href="mailto:dmitry.soshnikov@gmail.com">dmitry.soshnikov@gmail.com</a>&gt;:<br>
<div class="im"><br></div>
And I have a question. Why ES5 give control on values of internal<br>
attributes? What will improve that? &quot;Save&quot; augmentation of built-in?<br>
Good design of JS libraries?<br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>If there was some way to refer to the internal properties then it&#39;d be much easier to create test cases and do introspective analysis on the state of the interpreter. Although I&#39;d prefer some kind of special method for (at least) accessing them, maybe even a special method/mode because I&#39;m still unsure myself whether this could have dangerous (security related) repercussions.<br>
<br>Then there&#39;d be no more guessing or workarounds to check whether some property has certain attributes set or unset. You could just query them directly and verify their contents. It would make building a test suite of any kind much easier...<br>
<br>- peter<br>